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Calvert Inn Gourmet Bed & Breakfast and Restaurant in Calvert, TX


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Calvert Inn Gourmet Bed & Breakfast and Restaurant
Hosted By Sandy & Frank Hudson
Calvert, TX
3 Rooms
$105 to $145 per night
TO RESERVE A ROOM CALL
(800) 290-1213

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Inn Policies: Some bedrooms have private porches and swings as well. Enjoy the privacy of your own bathroom in rich terry-cloth bathrobes, provided in each room. Your every comfort has been seen to, and no luxury has been spared; from down comforters to triple-sheeted linens on each queen or king size bed.

Enjoy a long soak with bubbles and your own special rubber ducky in the c.1900 footed tub, right in your room. Fine linens, fluffy pillows and cozy bathrobes will help to settle you into the lifestyle of long ago. Go out onto your private balcony, with table, chairs and a porch swing; listen to the bubbling fountain and fish pond, breath deeply and look at the stars. Then you can turn on your in-room CD player
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Amenities
Inn Amenities
Antiques
Arts
Bird Watching
Fine Dining
Historic Area
Jacuzzi/Hot Tub
National/State Parks
Private Baths
Recipes
Scenic Views
Weddings
Wine Tasting




Inn Description: Welcome to the place that time forgot - Calvert, Texas. Below you will be introduced to some of the wonderful facts and strange fantasies that make up this small Texas town which was once the third largest city in the state of Texas. A Boom-town made by the railroad and a group of entrepreneurs that would make any city proud, Calvert has seen the ups and downs of almost a century and a half.

History:

A letter dated June 26, 1852, to the Grand Lodge of Texas from Gillespie Lodge No. 55, located at Wheelock, Texas, asked for a charter for Brazos Lodge to work under dispensation at Sterling on the Brazos. Their first worshipful master was Mr. H. L. Bennett. The lodge operated under dispensation till January 18, 1955, when they war chartered from the grand Lodge as Pierce Lodge No. 144 at Sterling on the Brazos, with Mr. G. W. Rutherford as worshipful Master. (Sterling was located two miles east of present Calvert on the Black Bridge Road.)

During the Civil War years beginning in 1861, the Lodge was inactive due to the men going to war, but continued to make meager returns to the Grand Lodge from 1861 through 1867. During the time members were called from their homes to war the Lodge was converted into a schoolhouse for the community. During this period many of the records of the Lodge were lost. A majority of the members were killed in the war and afterwards some were suspended for non-payment of dues. An appeal was made to the Grand Lodge for aid in reinstating members to work in the Lodge could resume. In May of 1869 a committee was appointed to ask the Grand Lodge to grant permission for sterling Lodge to be moved to the Calvert Depot, a distance of about two miles. The Calvert Depot was the hub for the Houston and Texas Central Railroad and Calvert was becoming the trading center of Robertson County. This permission was granted and the last stated meeting held at Sterling was December 24, 1869.

The first meeting held at the depot was January 3, 1870. At this time plans were formulated to build a new Lodge in Calvert in conjunction with the Methodist Episcopal Church. $500 was raised to secure the property. The first Lodge built in the city of Calvert was erected on the north side of Block 57, previously owned by Mr. E. C. Cobb.
The Lodge Room was dedicated in December, 1923. The building previously occupied by the Lodge was sold to H. M. Ryman. During the years 1941 to 1945, the world was again cast into war and our members answered the call of their country to arms. Our Lodge again struggled to exist during this time of turmoil. Pierce Lodge has had its ups and downs through the years, but it has always been and will continue to be an important part of Calvert's heritage. Without the past, we have no future.